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Error 5: Access is denied. when you try to start the DHCP Client service



When you start your computer, or try to start the DHCP client service, you may receive the following error:

Could not start the DHCP Client service on Local Computer.
Error 5: Access is denied.

This problem may occur after an upgrade from Windows 2000 to 2003, or after you’ve changed permissions in the registry.

In most cases, this error can easily be solved by granting extra permissions in the registry.
To make the permission changes in the registry, do the following:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit and click OK
  2. Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dhcp
  3. Right click the key DHCP and click Permissions. Click Add, type network service and click OK
  4. Select NETWORKSERVICE and check the Full control box to grant NETWORKSERVICE full control on the DHCP key.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes and to close the window

Do the same for the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit and click OK
  2. Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp
  3. Right click the key TcpIp and click Permissions. Click Add, type network service and click OK
  4. Select NETWORKSERVICE and check the Full control box to grant NETWORKSERVICE full control on the TcpIp key.
  5. Click OK to apply the changes and to close the window

To start the service, click Start, click Run, type services.msc and click OK
Right click DHCP client and click Start

Alternatively, you could click Start, click Run, type net start dhcp and click OK
The DHCP client service should now start

9 Comments

  1. NetRookie says:

    I had been experiencing problems connecting to my wired and wireless networks, later that I figured out that it was the autoIP configuration problem ( I had sticked to static IP), it was the DHCP problem. Your solution really worked for me, starting the DHCP service. Now I am to check whether the internet would start up using AutoIP configuration.
    Cheers.

  2. Rusty Shack says:

    No joy from the above.

    Failed step #2. Copy permissions from DHCP and TCPIP to their children (right-click, choose Permissions, click on the Advanced button at lower-right, check the box “Replace all child object permissions with inheritable permissions from this object” and confirm that choice). Still no joy.

    Failed step #3. Add new permission for COMPUTERNAME\Users (replace COMPUTERNAME with your own). Give Full Control to Users.

    Correct step #4. Do step 3. Then do step 2. So the “Users” id will have full control, and it will be copied to all the children of DHCP and TCPIP, to be identical to Administrator for these keys.

    Finally, joy!

    1. Fastfil1 says:

      Awesome answer. cured my tale of woe!

  3. Mike Renna says:

    You are a GOD! I spent way too long on this problem (started right after uninstalling McAfee). They told me to call my ISP.

    THANKS!

  4. J. Ramos says:

    1.Click Start, click Run, type regedit and click OK
    2.Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dhcp\Parameters
    3.Right click the key DHCP and click Permissions. Click Add, type network service and click OK
    4.Select NETWORKSERVICE and check the Full control box to grant NETWORKSERVICE full control on the DHCP key.
    5.Click OK to apply the changes and to close the window.
    6. Restart the DHCP Client service.

    That´s all.

    1. J. Ramos says:

      1.Click Start, click Run, type regedit and click OK
      2.Navigate to the following key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dhcp\Parameters
      3.Click Add, type network service and click OK
      4.Select NETWORK SERVICE and check the Full control box to grant NETWORK SERVICE full control on the Parameters key.
      5.Click OK to apply the changes and to close the window.
      6. Restart the DHCP Client service.

      That´s all.

  5. Temlock says:

    Just wanted to add to this thread as I had the exact same symptoms and tried all of these suggestions to no avail. As it turned out, I needed to run a CHKDSK /F as there were errors and corrupt sectors on the drive that were obviously affecting registry hives. After much searching and manipulating of registry permissions, GPO, etc, the CHKDSK /F resolved my issues instantly.

    Just wanted to share this in case it too is the root cause of someone’s woes.

  6. Jaap says:

    Had exactly this problem, and your solution fixed it for me.
    Thanks!

  7. Mke says:

    I have the problem described. Several Windows 2003 Servers use static IPs 192.168.x.x, and report this error to event log. I followed the procedure, but it did not help. Anybody knows some other solutions?

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